Tax Reform Framework Released

President Trump announced a nine-page framework for tax cuts on September 27, 2017. The Framework capitalizes on many ideas previously presented in the President’s Tax Outline and in the House Republican Blueprint. Congressional tax-writing committees have a lot of work to do in refining the details, but it gives us an idea of where tax reform may be headed.

Individual Tax Rates

The current rates now fall into seven brackets, ranging from 10% to 39.6%. The proposed plan would consolidate the current individual tax brackets into three: 12%, 25% and 35%. An additional top tax rate may be added and apply to the “highest-income taxpayers,” but it fails to mention the income level at this might take effect, or the rate that would be imposed.

The plan also does not specify which income levels would be taxed at each rate— and if the highest rate is set at 35 percent—it would greatly benefit the wealthiest taxpayers, who currently pay a top rate of 39.6 percent on income greater than $418,400 for single filers.

Child and Dependent Care Credits

Although the rate applied to the lowest income bracket would increase, typical families in the existing 10 percent bracket may be better off because of a larger child tax credit as well as an increase in the standard deduction. The child tax credit would be “significantly” increased, including a refundable portion offered to taxpayers who have higher levels of income than current law allows.

A new, non-refundable credit of $500 for those caring for non-child dependents (such as an elderly parent) would be added.

Standard and Itemized Deductions

Most itemized deductions would be eliminated, meaning that large medical expenses, state and local income taxes, real estate taxes, investment expenses and investment interest expense would no longer be deductible. However, home mortgage interest, charitable contributions, and tax benefits encouraging work, higher education and retirement savings would be retained.

The standard deduction and personal exemptions would be combined into one larger standard deduction: $12,000 for single filers and $24,000 for married taxpayers filing jointly. Home mortgage interest, charitable contributions, and tax benefits encouraging work, higher education and retirement savings would be retained. This means that Such a revision of the tax code, if enacted, would greatly increase the number of taxpayers choosing the standard deduction. The new, single deduction would be higher for many filers, except those who claim multiple children

The Alternative Minimum Tax (AMT) and the federal estate tax and generation-skipping transfer tax would be repealed under this framework. It is suspected that that the repeal will apply to gift taxes, as well.

Business and Corporate Taxes

The tax rate would be reduced for regular or “C” corporations from 35% to 20%. The corporate Alternative Minimum Tax (“AMT”) would be eliminated along with other methods to reduce the double taxation of corporate earnings.

Many small businesses are structured as “S” corporations, partnerships, limited liability companies (LLCs), or sole proprietorships; all of which pass through business profits and losses to their owners’ personal tax returns. Thus, “C” corporation income taxes may be avoided but the owners face personal tax rates as high as 39.6%. Pass-throughs now make up about 95 percent of businesses in the country and the bulk of corporate tax revenue for the government.

Under the proposed framework, business income from these “pass-through entities” would be taxed at a rate no higher than 25%. Such a measure would need to be drafted carefully in order to prevent personal income of wealthy individuals from being reclassified into lower-taxed business income. Whether these distributions would then be subject to a second level of tax at the individual owner level also needs to be addressed.

Deductions and Tax Credits

Most special deductions and tax credits, other than the R&D credit and the low-income housing tax credit, would be eliminated. It’s not clear which deductions will be eliminated; however, the Section 199 deduction was specifically mentioned as being eliminated.

Replace system of taxing companies’ worldwide income with a 100% exemption for dividends from foreign subsidiaries in which U.S. parent has a 10% stake or more. Reduce tax rate and tax on a global basis the foreign profits of U.S. multinational corporations.

Tax Write Offs for Depreciable Assets

Businesses that invest in depreciable assets, other than buildings, after September 27, 2017 would write them off immediately. This tax benefit, with no upper limit, would be in place for at least five years. As a tradeoff, the tax-deductibility of interest expense incurred by most taxable corporations would be partially limited.

If you have questions about how the proposed tax reform might affect you, please call us.