First-Year Start-Up Tax Issues

If creating a start-up business were an easy thing to do, then a lot more people would be doing it. For those who make the decision to fulfill their dreams and go for it, success relies on being fully prepared. Some of the most common stressors encountered by entrepreneurs involve tax liabilities, whether business is booming or they’re struggling to keep their head above water. The best way to avoid these pitfalls is to learn about them ahead of time. Here’s what every entrepreneur needs to know.

Give Careful Consideration to the Type of Business Organization You Choose
The entity that you choose for your start-up will have a big impact on how your taxes are handled, so make sure you’ve done your research to find the option that works best for your specific situation. Factors like the state where you’re doing business and the type of business you’re operating will be a consideration, and so will your ownership profile. Businesses that don’t plan on adding partners or shareholders in the future or that anticipate changing owners in the near future are probably limited to establishing as a C corporation or an S corporation, with the former offering more flexibility on ownership shifts, as well as the possibility of international investors.

Though there’s no law to prevent you from shifting to another type of entity in the future, doing so can be disruptive, so it makes sense to take your time and choose the option that fits best and makes the most sense based on your current ownership plans.

Choosing an Accounting Method
Unless you’re an accountant or have experience and significant knowledge of accounting, it’s a good idea to sit down with a professional to determine whether you’re going to use a cash accounting method, an accrual method, or a hybrid of the two. If you don’t have a background in bookkeeping and taxes, it may seem like an academic question, but it plays a big part in determining your tax liability. A lot of the determination will also depend on the type of business you run. An experienced accountant will be able to walk you through the decision that makes the most sense and that will be easiest to implement in compliance with IRS regulations.

Putting Internal Controls in Place
As a start-up, there are certain internal controls you need to put in place to ensure that your business is running smoothly and according to your stated objectives and goals. You also want to be sure that you’re set up to provide comprehensive information for external investors. Company policies need to be written and communicated with an eye to regulations. A CPA will be invaluable in helping you get these controls in place.

Paying Attention to Compliance
Every entrepreneur likes to do things their own way, but there are some issues where compliance is key. Failure to follow the rules and regulations could lead to stiff penalties and fines, or even to your business either temporarily or permanently being shut down. In addition to paying taxes on your business’s income, you also need to find out whether your locale requires a business license and what the rules are if you’re selling either a digital or physical product over state lines. Sales tax will need to be paid, workers’ compensation insurance will need to be purchased and a policy put in place if you have even a single employee, and if you’ve organized yourself as a Delaware corporation, then you’ll need to have an annual franchise tax report prepared, filed and paid, whether you generate income or not.

Creating a Way to Track Performance and Stay on Budget
One of the biggest mistakes new business owners make is failing to create a budget and stick to it. Failure to do so can easily lead to a shortfall in available funds, including those you need to pay your tax liability. Take the time to make a reasonable budget and establish what your start-up’s key performance indicators (KPIs) are for both cutting expenses and generating income. With those issues addressed, you give yourself a solid way to measure how you’re doing, and you’re likely to find both short-term and long-term tax planning easier too.

Starting a new business is a dream come true for many, but your focus has to go beyond your own area of expertise and interest. By working with a tax professional, you can be sure that you’ve addressed the tax-related problems that have tripped up many start-up organizations.

Please call us with any questions related to creating a start-up business.