Enhance Your Cash Flow, Enhance Your Business: The Top Tips You Need to Know

We’ve discussed at length in the past about how cash flow is ultimately one of the most important factors of a business that far too many people just aren’t paying enough attention to. Cash flow maintenance is about more than just knowing how much money is coming in versus how much money is going out. Even if your business is very close to true profitability, this ultimately won’t mean a thing if you’re dealing with clients who are slow to pay. This can seriously impact your momentum, and worse — your chances at long-term success.

To put it simply, enhancing your cash flow isn’t just about enhancing your accounting — it’s also about enhancing the very organization you’ve already worked so hard to build. With that in mind, there are a few key tips you’ll absolutely need to know about moving forward.

Technology Is Your Friend. It’s Time to Start Acting Like It
Perhaps the most important tip that you should start using to enhance your cash flow (and thus, your entire business) is to start leveraging the power of modern technology to your advantage. There are a wide range of different financial solutions that allow you to not only submit invoices to clients electronically, but that then allow those clients to pay you in exactly the same way.

Not only will this make it far, far easier for you to track money that is still “in play” so to speak, but it will also significantly help shorten the time it takes to get you paid for your products and services in the first place. This means that money will be coming in at a much faster rate, helping to make sure that you have the cash on hand necessary to take advantage of certain opportunities as they develop.

Use Your Credit Cards in the Right Ways
Another key tip that you can use to enhance your cash flow actually involves using your company credit card for purchases that you may otherwise pay for by check. Using your company credit card gives you an extra grace period to pay off the card in full each month. This essentially allows you to “push” that cash payment down the road, giving you a bit more breathing room than you’d have rather than the net 15 or net 30 that you’d be dealing with for check-based payments.

Get Organized and Stay That Way
Perhaps the most important step that entrepreneurs can take to enhance their cash flow involves not just getting organized, but doing anything that they have to in order to stay that way as long as possible. Consider creating different types of tier groups in your records, clearly separating people based on when they absolutely need to be paid.

Order everyone by who must be paid first — meaning that you’re definitely going to want to prioritize the government, payroll and certain vendors that may shut off your access to resources before anyone else. Certain others, on the other hand, can easily be paid later without too much undo fuss. Sure, you’d love to be able to pay everyone at the same time — but in the event that you can’t, this information will be invaluable to have when making strategic decisions regarding where your available funds should go.

This itself can also help identify certain trends and patterns that make the next six, 12 and 24 months of essential decisions far easier to predict.

Never Be Afraid to Consult a Professional
At the end of the day, the most important tip that you need to not just understand but truly believe in with regards to cash flow is that you should never be afraid to enlist the help of a trained professional. You’re a business leader and you’re good at what you do. You wouldn’t have gotten this far if you weren’t.

However, that doesn’t make you a financial expert and it certainly doesn’t mean that you’ll have the time necessary in a day to devote to something as mission-critical as proper bookkeeping and other financial tasks. In certain cases you might, sure — but if you start to feel like this is getting overwhelming, it is in your own best interest to pick up the phone and find someone who can lend you a much-needed helping hand. Find an accounting expert who doesn’t just have experience in terms of cash flow, but who understands your niche and knows exactly how a business just like yours needs to perform.

Not only will this help put you in a better position to make positive cash flow gains moving forward, but it’ll also give you the essential peace of mind that only comes with knowing your financial needs are being properly (and actively) taken care of.

How to Identify When the Time Is Right to Bring an Accounting Pro Into the Fold

Running your own business is a complicated affair with a wide range of different “moving parts” to concern yourself with, but many people don’t realize how many of them ultimately lead back to your finances until it’s far too late.

A large part of your ability to be successful in the long-term will ultimately come down to the rate at which you expand. Grow your business too quickly and you might spread yourself too thin. Grow too slowly and you’ll be passing up opportunities that are rightfully yours, leaving a lot of money on the table at the same time. Your control over your finances will dictate whether you’re able to strike that perfect balance the way you need to.

Marketing, paying vendors, paying employees, managing client relationships – all of it depends on the quality of your bookkeeping (or lack thereof). To that end, a large part of your success will ultimately come down to your ability to identify when the time is right to stop doing things yourself and bring a professional accounting provider into the fold. To do this, you’ll need to keep a few key things in mind.

The Warning Signs You Need to Know
As it does every year, Intuit recently released a survey outlining the state of small business accounting in the United States. The results are very telling in terms of when people should bring a financial professional into the fold – and what the consequences are of inaction.

Asset tracking, for example, is something that you may not immediately think impacts your bookkeeping, but it does in a fairly significant way. Ghost assets are fixed assets that have either been rendered unusable or are physically missing. However, “out of sight, out of mind” does not apply in this case – they still count toward a business’s tax and insurance liability, thus making it difficult to properly reconcile their books every year.

Of the people who responded to Intuit’s survey, 74% indicated that they didn’t understand this, and 49% said that they didn’t even know what ghost assets were in the first place. If you are among those numbers, congratulations on arriving at one of the biggest indicators that you need to bring a financial professional into your business (and also that you’ll likely want to conduct inventory on a regular schedule moving forward).

Other signs that the time is right to bring a accounting professional into the fold ultimately come down to the most pressing financial issues that most businesses face. 51% of people who responded to Intuit’s survey said that accounts receivable and collections were their most significant business challenge. 44% said that cash flow was always something they were concerned about, and getting a better handle on “money in vs. money out” was always a top priority.

Cash flow troubles, it is important to note, is the number one reason why most small businesses fail within the first four years of existence.

Other pressing issues included properly managing paperwork on a regular basis, accurately closing the books each month, and managing payroll. The major thing to understand is that a financial professional will be able to help with ALL of these things, taking the stress off your plate so that you can focus simply on running your business like you should be. If ANY of these things are ones that keep you awake every night, or you feel these issues are significantly affecting your ability to grow and evolve, guess what? It’s time to contact a professional to do as much of the heavy lifting as possible.

Never Underestimate the Power of Trust
Consider it from another perspective. Recently, small business owners responded to a survey outlining all of their most pressing accounting issues. The survey, conducted by Wasp Barcode Technologies, spoke to 393 small business leaders of nearly every organization size and industry that you can think of.

When asked to rank the professionals that they worked with on a regular basis in the order of importance, these business leaders overwhelmingly agreed that accounting experts were one of the single most valuable assets they had. They outranked attorneys, insurance agents, technology firms and even staffing services.

This is how important tax professionals are: Business leaders know that much of what they’re trying to do each day, along with what they hope to be able to accomplish in the future, would be impossible without the stable foundation that only an accounting professional can provide.

When It Comes to Accounting, Knowledge Is Power
At the end of the day, it’s important to remember what may be the single most important piece of advice for small business owners when it comes to accounting: It is far, far cheaper to hire an accounting professional today before things get out of hand tomorrow.

Think about it this way: A large part of the reason why you got where you are today is because you took the initiative and started to do things for yourself. You have a “can do” attitude that just won’t quit, and you’ve built something incredibly successful from the ground up as a result. But there are certain situations where you cannot let pride get in the way of making the right decision, and accounting is absolutely one of them.

You already have a full-time job: running your business. You don’t have the time to take on another one, let alone the expertise to guarantee that you’re making the best decisions at all times. Yet this is exactly what business accounting is – a heavily specialized, full-time job that requires a careful hand and attention to detail that is second to none.

Bringing in a professional sooner rather than later will not only help make sure that you have cleaner books and other records, it will also significantly reduce the chance that you’ll get hit with penalties for things like late taxes and allow you to be much, much more successful in the long term. These types of benefits, to say nothing of the peace of mind that only comes with knowing your accounting is taken care of, are things that you literally cannot put a price on.

Startups: Research Credit Can Offset Payroll Taxes

A little-known tax benefit for new, qualified small businesses is the ability to apply a portion of their research credit – no more than $250,000 – to pay the employer’s share of their employees’ FICA withholding requirement (the 6.2% payroll tax). This can be quite a benefit, as in their early years, start-up companies generally do not have any taxable profits for the research credit to offset; quite often, it is in these early years when companies make expenditures that qualify for the research credit. This can substantially help these young companies’ cash flow.

Research Credit – The research credit is equal to 20% of qualified research expenditures in excess of the established base amount. If using the simplified method, the research credit is equal to 14% of qualified research expenditures in excess of 50% of the company’s average research expenditures in the prior three years.

Qualified Research – Research expenditures that qualify for the credit generally include spending on research that is undertaken for the purpose of discovering technological information. This information is intended to be useful in the development of a new or improved business component for the taxpayer relating to new or improved functionality, performance, reliability or quality.

Qualified Small Business (QSB) – To apply the research credit to payroll taxes, a company must be a QSB and must not be a tax-exempt organization. A QSB is a corporation or partnership with these criteria:

  1. The entity does not have gross receipts in any year before the fourth preceding year. Thus, the payroll credit can only be taken in the first 5 years of the entity’s existence. However, this rule does not require a business to have been in existence for at least 5 years.
  2. The entity’s gross receipts for the year when the credit is elected must be less than $5 million.

Any person (other than a corporation or partnership) is a QSB if that person meets the two requirements above after taking into account the person’s aggregate gross receipts received for all the person’s trades or businesses.

Example – The taxpayer is a calendar-year individual with one business that operates as a sole proprietorship. The taxpayer had gross receipts of $4 million in 2016. For the years 2012, 2013, 2014 and 2015, the taxpayer had gross receipts of $1 million, $7 million, $4 million, and $3 million, respectively; the taxpayer did not have gross receipts for any taxable year prior to 2012. The taxpayer is a qualified small business for 2016 because he had less than $5 million in gross receipts for 2016 and did not have gross receipts before 2012 (the beginning of the 5-taxable-year period that ends in 2016). The taxpayer’s gross receipts in the years 2012-2015 are not relevant in determining whether he is a qualified small business in taxable year 2016. Because the taxpayer had gross receipts in 2012, the taxpayer will not be a qualified small business for 2017, regardless of his gross receipts in that year.

The research credit must first be accrued back to the preceding year, where it must be used to offset any tax liability for that year. Then, the excess (up to $250,000 maximum) can be used to offset the 6.2% employer payroll tax. Any amount not used is carried forward to the next year.If you have questions related to the research credit or if your business could benefit from using the credit to offset payroll taxes, please give us a call.

Hobby or Business? It Makes a Difference for Taxes

Taxpayers are often confused by the differences in tax treatment between businesses that are entered into for profit and those that are not, commonly referred to as hobbies. The differences are:

Businesses Entered Into for Profit – For businesses entered into for profit, the profits are taxable, and losses are generally deductible against other income. The income and expenses are commonly reported on a Schedule C, and the profit or loss—after subtracting expenses from the business income—is carried over to the taxpayer’s 1040. (An exception to deducting the business loss may apply if the activity is considered a “passive” activity, but most Schedule C proprietors actively participate in their business, so the details of the passive loss rules aren’t included in this article.)

Hobbies – Hobbies, on the other hand, are not entered into for profit, and the government does not permit a taxpayer to deduct their hobby expenses, in excess of any hobby income, on their tax return. Thus, hobby income is reported directly on their 1040, and any expenses not exceeding the income are deductible as miscellaneous itemized deductions on their Schedule A, assuming the taxpayer is not claiming the standard deduction, in which case they would be reporting income but not deducting the expenses.

So, what distinguishes a business from a hobby? The IRS provides nine factors to consider when making the judgment. No single factor is decisive, but all must be considered together in determining whether an activity is for profit. The nine factors are:

  1. Is the activity carried out in a businesslike manner? Maintenance of complete and accurate records for the activity is a definite plus for a taxpayer, as is a business plan that formally lays out the taxpayer’s goals and describes how the taxpayer realistically expects to meet those expectations.
  2. How much time and effort does the taxpayer spend on the activity? The IRS looks favorably at substantial amounts of time spent on the activity, especially if the activity has no great recreational aspects. Full-time work in another activity is not always a detriment if a taxpayer can show that the activity is regular; time spent by a qualified person hired by the taxpayer can also count in the taxpayer’s favor.
  3. Does the taxpayer depend on the activity as a source of income? This test is easiest to meet when a taxpayer has little income or capital from other sources (i.e., the taxpayer could not afford to have this operation fail).
  4. Are losses from the activity the result of sources beyond the taxpayer’s control? Losses from unforeseen circumstances like drought, disease, and fire are legitimate reasons for not making a profit. The extent of the losses during the start-up phase of a business also needs to be looked at in the context of the kind of activity involved.
  5. Has the taxpayer changed business methods in an attempt to improve profitability? The taxpayer’s efforts to turn the activity into a profit-making venture should be documented.
  6.  What is the taxpayer’s expertise in the field? Extensive study of this field’s accepted business, economic, and scientific practices by the taxpayer before entering into the activity is a good sign that profit intent exists.
  7. What success has the taxpayer had in similar operations? Documentation on how the taxpayer turned a similar operation into a profit-making venture in the past is helpful.
  8. What is the possibility of profit? Even though losses might be shown for several years, the taxpayer should try to show that there is realistic hope of a good profit.
  9. Will there be a possibility of profit from asset appreciation? Although profit may not be derived from an activity’s current operations, asset appreciation could mean that the activity will realize a large profit when the assets are disposed of in the future. However, the appreciation argument may mean nothing without the taxpayer’s positive action to make the activity profitable in the present.
There is a presumption that a taxpayer has a profit motive if an activity shows a profit for any three or more years within a period of five consecutive years. However, the period is two out of seven consecutive years if the activity involves breeding, training, showing, or racing horses.

All of this may seem pretty complicated, so please call this office if you have any questions or need additional details for your particular circumstances.

How An Accountant Can Help Your Small Business Boom

One of the most positive qualities that many small business owners share is a burning desire – an insatiable willingness – to “do it all.” It’s what separates entrepreneurs from employees in the first place. An employee is more than willing to set out on the path that someone else has carved for them. An entrepreneur has a need to carve a path for themselves.

Unfortunately, this mentality can also get even the most passionate small business owners into a bit of trouble – particularly when it comes to their finances. Being able to balance your own checkbook and running the finances of a small business are NOT the same thing, nor should they ever be treated as such. To that end, the importance of finding the right accounting professional to help support your small business as it continues to grow and evolve cannot be overstated enough.

There are a number of essential ways, in particular, that an accounting expert can help your small business.

When You’re Just Starting Out
Perhaps the most important role that an accounting professional will play in terms of your small business takes place when you’re just starting out. One of the most common mistakes that many business owners make involves selecting the wrong business entity – a small problem that can have major ramifications when tax season rolls around. A accounting pro who is intimately involved with the makeup of your business from a basic level can help make sure this doesn’t happen to you.

Along the same lines, an accounting professional can also help make sure that your accounting system is properly set up in the first place. They can make sure that you’re picking the right accounting system that actually supports your long-term goals for your business and can create a chart of accounts to offer superior visibility into money coming into and out of your organization.

The Day-to-Day Grind
Another one of the hugely invaluable ways that an accounting expert can help your small business comes by the small, yet critical, decisions they make on a daily basis. A financial expert can help give you greater visibility into cash flow (including accounts payable and accounts receivable), for example. Cash flow and other instability issues are one of the major reasons why most small businesses fail in the first place, and having the right person at your side can help you avoid them altogether.

An accounting professional can also help make sure your security controls are properly set up and executed, particularly in terms of factors like compliance. Remember that we’re living in an era where the average cost of a data breach has ballooned to almost $4 million. If the security aspect of your finances is not properly accounted for, it could be putting your entire business at risk. Even one small data breach could expose the personal records of multiple clients, something that opens the door to things like lawsuits, and that could eventually close the door on everything you’ve worked so hard to build.

Other Benefits
A financial professional will also play an important role when it comes to growing your small business. Remember that both an inability to scale up as fast as you need AND growing your business faster than you can sustain are additional reasons why many small businesses fail. Because such a large part of your growth and expansion pace has to do with personal finances, it stands to reason that bringing someone into the fold who can leverage their years of experience to your advantage is a very good idea.

A financial expert can help you raise money – particularly helpful if you’re getting ready to bring a new product or service to market. If you ever decide that this chapter of your life is closed and that it’s time to look for new opportunities, these professionals can also help sell your small business as well. Selling a business is a process filled with potential mistakes just waiting to happen, and the expert hand of someone who has been in this position before is something that you literally cannot put a price on. It isn’t just an investment in your organizational ability – it’s an investment in the future of your business as a whole.

In the End
The fact of the matter is that there really is no “one size fits all” approach to small business accounting. Every business is a little bit different, which will require a certain level of care and finesse when it comes to finances in particular. Only by consulting the help of a professional as early on in the process as possible will you be able to avoid the normal pitfalls of running a small business and create a financially stable foundation from which to work.

If you are considering starting a new business, it may be appropriate to consult with this office before you get too far through the process. Please call for assistance.

Does Your Employer Misclassify You as an Independent Contractor Instead of as an Employee?

It is not uncommon for employers to misclassify employees as independent contractors, either to intentionally avoid their withholding and tax responsibilities or because they are not aware of the laws regarding the issue. If your employer reports your income on a Form 1099 (as opposed to a W-2), you are being treated as an independent contractor, not as an employee. This can have significant ramifications in terms of how much you have to pay in income, Social Security, and Medicare taxes.

The general distinction, of course, is that an employee is an individual who works under the direction and control of an employer, and an independent contractor is a business owner or contractor who provides services to other businesses.

To determine whether a worker is an independent contractor or an employee, the IRS examines the relationship between the worker and the business and considers all evidence regarding control and independence. This evidence falls into the following three categories:

(1) Behavioral control covers whether the business has the right to direct or control how the work is done through instructions, training, or other means. Employees are generally given instructions on when and where to work, what tools to use, where to purchase supplies, what order to follow, and so on.

(2) Financial control covers whether the business has the right to control the financial and business aspects of the worker’s job. This includes the extent to which the worker has unreimbursed business expenses; the extent of his or her investment in the facilities being used; the extent to which his or her services are made available to the relevant market; how he or she is paid; and the extent to which he or she can realize a profit or incur a loss.

(3) Type of relationship includes any written contracts that describe the relationship the parties intended to create; the extent to which the worker is available to perform services for other, similar businesses; whether the business provides the worker with employee-type benefits, such as insurance, a pension plan, vacation pay, or sick pay; the permanency of the relationship; and the extent to which the worker’s services are a key aspect of the company’s regular business.

When a worker’s status is in doubt, Form SS-8 (Determination of Employee Work Status for Purposes of Federal Employment Taxes and Income Tax Withholding) can be used. This form may be completed by an employer or a worker; it asks the IRS to determine whether the worker is an employee or an independent contractor for federal tax purposes. Form SS-8 is filed separately from the requestor’s tax return. The IRS does not issue determinations for proposed employment arrangements or hypothetical situations, and it will only issue a determination if the statute of limitations for the year at issue hasn’t expired.

If an employee wants to avoid paying self-employed tax on 1099-MISC income after he or she has already been determined to be an employee – or when he or she has filed an SS-8 but has not received a response – that individual can file Form 8919, which only requires payment of what would have been withheld if the worker had been treated as an employee. Form 8919 requires the employee to choose one of these codes:

Code A. I filed Form SS-8 and received a determination letter stating that I am an employee of this firm.
Code C. I received other correspondence from the IRS that states I am an employee.
Code G. I filed Form SS-8 with the IRS but have not received a reply.
Code H. I received a Form W-2 and a Form 1099-MISC from this firm for the same tax year. The amount on Form 1099-MISC should have been included as wages on the Form W-2.

If using Code H, do not file an SS-8. Here are some examples of amounts that are sometimes erroneously included (but not necessarily deliberately misclassified) on Form 1099-MISC and that should be reported as wages on Form W-2: employee bonuses, awards, travel expense reimbursements not paid under an accountable plan, scholarships, and signing bonuses.

If Code G is used, both the employee and the firm that paid the employee may be contacted for additional information. Use of this code is not a guarantee that the IRS will agree with the worker’s opinion as to his or her status. If the IRS does not agree that the worker is an employee, the worker may be billed an additional amount for the employment tax, as well as penalties and interest resulting from the change in the worker’s status.

If the IRS determination is for multiple open years, the employee can amend returns for open years to recover a portion of the self-employed tax paid.

If you have questions about being misclassified as an independent contractor, please give this office a call.

Financial KPIs: What They Are and What You Need to Know

As a small business owner, the importance of making purpose-driven decisions is something that cannot be overstated enough. Every choice that you make must be one with a particular goal in mind – whether it’s to attract new customers, increase revenue, decrease expenditures, increase liquidity, etc. But simply making the decision itself is not enough – you also have to find a way to measure the result of your action against what you were trying to accomplish in the first place.

This, in essence, is what KPIs are all about.

Also commonly referred to as “key performance indicators,” they represent the best kind of measurable value that reflect how we’ll you’re doing in a particular context – the kind that is objectionable, black and white, and provides you with a clear indication of what you need to be doing moving forward. Thanks, in particular, to the evolution of cloud computing and the advent of real-time accounting, it’s easier than ever for business owners to monitor the health of their organization through financial KPIs.

When doing so, however, you need to keep a few key things in mind.

Financial KPI Considerations
Part of the reason why KPIs are so powerful in the first place is because they’re malleable – based on exactly what you’re trying to accomplish, you can take a micro look at a particular aspect of your finances to tell you how close or how far away you are from that goal.

With that in mind, it’s important to realize that there is no “one size fits all” approach to KPI selection. If you looked at the financials of your closest competitors, they might be tracking wildly different data than you are – even though you’re both operating in the same industry.

Because of this, you need to figure out the long-term goals that are most important to you first. Then, you can reverse engineer the KPIs that you should be watching to help guide you and your business in the right direction.

KPIs to Watch Out For
Now that you’ve got a deeper understanding of what KPIs measure in relation to your goals, it’s time to learn more about the specific KPIs that you should be paying attention to monitor those goals in real-time.

  • Operating Cash Flow. Also referred to as OCF, this points to the total amount of money your company is generating on a daily basis. This can be a great way to determine whether you’re able to maintain the positive cash flow needed for growth, or if you should start looking for external funding. OCF adjusts your net income for factors like depreciation, inventory fluctuations, accounts receivable changes and more.
  • Current Ratio. This KPI is an indication of whether or not your company can pay all of its financial obligations in one year. This takes into consideration all of your current assets and compares them with your current liabilities. A Current Ratio of less than one tells you that you will NOT be able to fulfill all financial obligations, thus requiring additional cash flow. For the best results, try to keep Current Ratio between 1.5 and 3.
  • Burn Rate. This clues you in on the rate at which your company is spending money on a weekly, monthly or annual basis. This is particularly helpful for companies that don’t necessarily go through extensive financial analysis, as it’s a quick look into whether or not your current operating costs are sustainable in the long-term.
  • Income. This, simply put, looks at how much money you’re generating. Based on how much money you’d like to be generating, you can then make a determination about how much you need to increase sales and, thus, set about trying to figure out how to do that.
  • Profit/Loss. This is a quick look into whether your company’s expenditures are MORE than your income.
  • Cash Flow Forecasting. Remember that improper cash flow is literally the number one reason why most businesses close prematurely. If you want to get better at cash flow management, you need to start taking a deeper look at what your cash flow is predicted to be both in the short and long-term. Diving deeper into this topic now can help you mitigate some fairly significant risks later on.

If you have any additional questions about KPIs that you’d like to see answered, or if you have other concerns that you’d like to have addressed in a little more detail, please feel free to contact our office today – someone is ready and waiting to provide you with the personalized level of care and attention to detail that you deserve.

Using Home Equity for Business Needs

Small business owners frequently find it difficult to obtain financing for their businesses without pledging their personal assets. With home mortgage interest rates at historic lows, tapping into your home equity is a tempting alternative but one with tax ramifications that should be carefully considered.

Generally, interest on debt used to acquire and operate your business is deductible against that business. However, depending upon the circumstances of the loan structure, debt secured by your home may be nondeductible, only partially deductible or wholly deductible against your business.

Home mortgage interest is limited to the interest on $1 million of acquisition debt and $100,000 of equity debt secured by a taxpayer’s primary residence and designated second home. The interest on the debts within these limits can only be treated as home mortgage interest and must be deducted as part of your itemized deductions. Only the excess can be deducted for your business, provided that the use of the funds can be traced to your business use. This creates a number of problems:

  • Using the Standard Deduction – If you do not itemize your deductions, you will be unable to deduct the interest on the first $100,000 of the equity debt, which cannot be allocated to your business.
  • Subject to the AMT – Even if you do itemize your deductions, if you happen to be subject to the alternative minimum tax (AMT), you still would not be able to deduct the first $100,000 of equity debt interest, since it is not allowed as a deduction for AMT purposes.
  • Subject to Self-Employment (SE) Tax – Your self-employment tax (Social Security and Medicare) is based on the net profits from your business. If the net profit is higher, because not all of the interest is deductible by the business, your SE tax may also be higher.

    Example: Suppose the mortgage you incurred to purchase your home (acquisition debt) has a current balance of $165,000 and your home is worth $400,000. You need $150,000 to acquire a new business. To obtain the needed cash at the best interest rates, you decide to refinance your home mortgage for $315,000. The interest on this new loan will be allocated as follows:

    New Loan: $ 315,000
    Part Representing Acquisition Debt – 165,000   52.38%
    Balance $ 150,000
    First $100,000 Treated as Home Equity Debt – 100,000   31.75%
    Balance Traced to Business Use $ 50,000   15.87% 

    If the interest for the year on the refinanced debt was $10,000, then that interest would be deducted as follows:

    Itemized Deduction Regular Tax      $ 8,413   84.13%
    Itemized Deduction Alternative Minimum Tax $ 5,238   52.38%
    Business Expense      $ 1,587   15.87%

There is a special tax election that allows you to treat any specified home loan as not secured by the home. If you file this election, then interest on the loan can no longer be deducted as home mortgage interest, since tax law requires that qualified home mortgage debt be secured by the home. However, this election would allow the normal interest tracing rules to apply to that unsecured debt. This might be a smart move if the entire proceeds were used for business and all of the interest expense could be treated as a business expense. However, if the loan were a mixed-use loan and part of it actually represented home debt (such as a refinanced home loan), then the part that represented the home debt could not be allocated back to the home, and the interest on that portion of the debt would become nondeductible and would provide no tax benefit.

Example: Using the same scenario as the previous example but electing to treat the mortgage as unsecured by the home, the deductible business interest for the year would be $4,762 [($150,000/$315,000) x $10,000]. None of the balance of the interest would be deductible.

As you can see, using equity from your home can create some complex tax situations. Please contact this office for assistance in determining the best solution for your particular tax situation.

QuickBooks Tip: Are You Memorizing Transactions? Should You Be?

You know that QuickBooks saves a lot of time. But have you explored how it does so by memorizing transactions?

Your accounting work involves a lot of repetition. You send invoices. Pay bills. Create purchase orders. Generate payroll checks and submit payroll taxes.

Some of the time, you only fill out those transaction forms once. You might be doing a one-time purchase, like paying for some new office furniture. Other times, though, you’re paying or charging the same companies or individuals on a regular basis.

QuickBooks contains a shortcut to those recurring tasks, called Memorized Transactions. You can save the details that remain the same every time, and use that template every time the bill or invoice is due, which can save a lot of time and improve accuracy. Here’s how it works.

Making Copies
To memorize a transaction, you first need to create a model for it. Let’s say you have a monthly bill for $450 that’s paid to Bruce’s Office Machines. You’d click Enter Bills on the home page or open the Vendors menu and select Enter Bills. Fill in the blanks and select from drop-down lists to create the bill. Then click Memorize in the horizontal toolbar at the top of the form. This window will open.

Before you can Memorize a transaction, you first have to create a model (template) for it.

The vendor’s name will already be filled in on the Memorize Transaction screen. Look directly below that. There are three ways that QuickBooks can handle these Memorized Transactions when one of their due dates is approaching:

  • Add to my Reminders List. If you click the button in front of this option, the current transaction will appear on your Reminders List every time it’s due. You might request this for transactions that will change some every time they’re processed, like a utility bill that’s always expected on the same day, but which has a different amount every month.
  • Do Not Remind Me. Obviously, QuickBooks will not post a reminder if you click this button. This is best used for transactions that don’t recur on a regular basis. Maybe you have a snow-shoveling service that you pay only when there’s a storm. So the date is always different, but everything else is the same.
  • Automate Transaction Entry. Be very careful with this one. It’s reserved for transactions that are identical except for the issue date. They don’t need your approval – they’re just created and dispatched.

Click the down arrow in the field to the right of How Often and select the correct interval. Then click the calendar icon to pick a date for the next occurrence. If you have selected Automate Transaction Entry, the grayed-out lines below Next Date not shown here) contain fields for Number Remaining and Days in Advance to Enter.

How Does QuickBooks Know?
Obviously, you’ll want advance warning of transactions that will require processing. QuickBooks lets you specify how many days’ notice you want for each type. Open the Edit menu and select Preferences. Click Reminders in the left vertical pane, then the Company Preferences tab. You can tell QuickBooks whether you want to see a summary in each category or a list, or no Reminder. Then you can enter the number of days’ warning you want.

QuickBooks lets you specify the content and timing of your Reminders.

Working with Memorized Transactions
Once you’ve created some Memorized Transactions, you will undoubtedly need to review them at some point. QuickBooks makes this happen. Open the Lists menu and select Memorized Transaction List to see all the templates for recurring bills, invoices, etc., that you’ve defined. Right-click on one you want to work with, and this menu appears:

The Memorized Transaction List with the right-click window open

You have several options here. If your list is so long that it fills multiple screens, you can Find the transaction you’re looking for. If you’ve created multiple related transactions, you can save them as a New Group. You can also Edit, Delete, and Enter Memorized Transactions.

Anytime you’re letting QuickBooks do something on its own, it’s critical that you thoroughly understand the mechanics of setting the process up. We’d be happy to go over the whole topic of Memorized Transactions with you, or any other aspect of QuickBooks operations.

8 Financial Tips to Help Save Money While Building Your Startup

Starting a new business is one of life’s most exciting adventures. However, in order to build a successful company you need to start turning a profit as soon as possible. In the beginning of any business, expenses are unavoidable, but you can increase your profits by minimizing these expenses as much as possible. Here are eight tips you can use to save money while building your startup company.

1. Be careful with perks.
As a new business, you want to attract the best employees to your company. However, trying to offer the same perks as a venture capital startup can put you in debt quickly. Many successful businesses started in a garage, and there is no shame in keeping things simple at first. Once you’ve made it, you can start thinking about adding cappuccino machines, ping pong tables, and other perks to your office environment.

2. Use free software programs.
As you begin building your new business, resist the urge to invest in the latest, most expensive software programs. Instead, look for inexpensive software programs, or find programs that offer a lengthy free trial period. For example, instead of investing in Microsoft Office, you may consider using the free software programs offered by Google or Trello.

3. Make the most of your credit cards.
If you already have credit cards, make sure you are getting the most out of any perks they offer, such as frequent flyer miles or cash back. If you are planning to apply for a business credit card, research your options carefully, and choose the card that will give you the best benefits.

4. Hire interns from local colleges.
Instead of looking to the open market to find all of your employees, consider hiring interns from a local college instead. These individuals work for much less than a seasoned professional would, and they are often eager to prove themselves in the workplace.

5. Barter for services.
As you work to grow your business, you may need a variety of services from independent contractors or other companies. Instead of offering to pay cash for the services you receive, try to offer a different type of benefit that won’t impact your bottom line as much. For example, you may offer some of your own products or services, or you may allow the other party to collect a small amount of the profits you earn because of their services.

6. Minimize your personal expenses.
Because you will likely be investing a lot of your own money into your startup, you can increase profitability by reducing your personal expenses. Be careful about how you spend money, especially when you start bringing in revenue. Avoid making large purchases, such as a new house or car, unless they are absolutely necessary. Consider working with your accountant to keep track of all of your expenses so you can identify opportunities to cut back.

7. Outsource some of your projects.
To save more money while your business is getting off the ground, consider outsourcing some of your smaller projects, such as building or updating your website. Outsourcing one-time projects to independent contractors or consulting companies can be much more cost-effective than trying to hire a full-time employee to handle the job.

8. Use LinkedIn for recruitment.
Recruiting new employees can be expensive, especially if you are determined to find the best people. To cut down on these costs, consider using LinkedIn to recruit new people for your startup. Although you will have to do some of the legwork, you won’t spend as much as you would with other recruiting strategies.

Regardless of the steps you take to save money as your business grows, you will still need to manage your funds carefully to ensure that your financial situation is improving over time. A professional accountant can help you set up a realistic budget and cash flow forecast to keep you on the right track. Contact our office today to learn more.