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Back-Door Roth IRAs

Many individuals who are saving for retirement favor Roth IRAs over traditional IRAs because the former allows for both accumulation and post-retirement distributions to be tax-free. In comparison, contributions to traditional IRAs may be deductible, earnings are tax-deferred, and distributions are generally taxable. Anyone who is under age 70.5 and who has compensation can make a contribution to a traditional IRA (although the deduction may be limited). However, not everyone is allowed to make a Roth IRA contribution.

High-income taxpayers are limited in the annual amount they can contribute to a Roth IRA. The maximum contribution for 2016 is $5,500 ($6,500 if age 50 or older), but the allowable 2016 contribution for joint-filing taxpayers phases out at an adjustable gross income (AGI) between $184,000 and $194,000 (or an AGI between $0 and $9,999 for married taxpayers filing separately). For unmarried taxpayers, the phase-out is between $117,000 and $132,000.

However, tax law also includes a provision that allows taxpayers to convert their traditional IRA funds to Roth IRAs without any AGI restrictions. Although deductible contributions to a traditional IRA have AGI restrictions (for those who are in an employer’s plan), nondeductible contributions do not.

Thus, higher-income taxpayers can first make a nondeductible contribution to a traditional IRA and then convert that IRA to a Roth IRA. This is commonly referred to as a “back-door Roth IRA.”

BIG PITFALL: However, there is a big pitfall to back-door IRAs, and it can produce unexpected taxable income. Taxpayers and their investment advisers often overlook this pitfall, which revolves around the following rule: For distribution purposes, all of a taxpayer’s IRAs (except Roth IRAs) are considered to be one account, so distributions are considered to be taken pro rata from both the deductible and nondeductible portions of the IRA. The prorated amount of the deducted contributions is taxable. Thus, a taxpayer who is contemplating a back-door Roth IRA contribution must carefully consider and plan for the consequences of this “one IRA” rule before making the conversion.

There is a possible, although complicated, solution to this problem. Rolling over IRAs into other types of qualified retirement plans, such as employer retirement plans and 401(k) plans, is permitted tax-free. However, a rollover to a qualified plan is limited to the taxable portion of the IRA. If an employer’s plan permits, a taxpayer could roll the entire taxable portion of his or her IRA into the employer’s plan, leaving behind only nondeductible IRA contributions, which can then be converted into a Roth IRA tax-free.

Before taking any action, please call this office to discuss strategies for making Roth IRA contributions or to convert existing traditional IRAs into Roth IRAs.

Tax Filing Deadline Rapidly Approaching

Just a reminder to those who have not yet filed their 2014 tax return that April 15, 2015 is the due date to either file your return and pay any taxes owed, or file for the automatic six-month extension and pay the tax you estimate to be due.

In addition, the April 15, 2015 deadline also applies to the following:

  • Tax year 2014 balance-due payments – Taxpayers that are filing extensions are cautioned that the filing extension is an extension to file, NOT an extension to pay a balance due. Late payment penalties and interest will be assessed on any balance due, even for returns on extension. Taxpayers anticipating a balance due will need to estimate this amount and include their payment with the extension request.
  • Tax year 2014 contributions to a Roth or traditional IRA – April 15 is the last day contributions for 2014 can be made to either a Roth or traditional IRA, even if an extension is filed.
  • Individual estimated tax payments for the first quarter of 2015 – Taxpayers, especially those who have filed for an extension, are cautioned that the first installment of the 2015 estimated taxes are due on April 15. If you are on extension and anticipate a refund, all or a portion of the refund can be allocated to this quarter’s payment on the final return when it is filed at a later date. If the refund won’t be enough to fully cover the April 15 installment, you may need to make a payment with the April 15 voucher. Please call this office for any questions.
  • Individual refund claims for tax year 2011 – The regular three-year statute of limitations expires on April 15 for the 2011 tax return. Thus, no refund will be granted for a 2011 original or amended return that is filed after April 15. Caution: The statute does not apply to balances due for unfiled 2011 returns.

 

If this office is holding up the completion of your returns because of missing information, please forward that information as quickly as possible in order to meet the April 15 deadline. Keep in mind that the last week of tax season is very hectic, and your returns may not be completed if you wait until the last minute. If it is apparent that the information will not be available in time for the April 15 deadline, then let the office know right away so that an extension request, and 2015 estimated tax vouchers if needed, may be prepared.

If your returns have not yet been completed, please call right away so that we can schedule an appointment and/or file an extension if necessary.

Retirement Savings: the Earlier, the Better

Generally, teenagers and young adults do not consider the long-term benefits of retirement savings. Their priorities for their earnings are more for today than that distant and rarely considered retirement. Yet contributions to a retirement plan early in life can enjoy years of growth and provide a substantial nest egg at retirement.

Due to its long-term benefits of tax-free accumulation, a nondeductible Roth IRA may be the best option. During most individuals’ early working years, their income is usually at its lowest, allowing them to qualify for a Roth IRA at a time where the need for a tax deduction offered by other retirement plans is not important.

Because retirement will not be their focus at that age, young adults may balk at having to give up their earnings. Parents, grandparents, or other individuals might consider funding all or part of the child’s Roth contribution. It could even be in the form of a birthday or holiday gift. Take, for example, a 17-year-old who has a summer job and earns $1,500. Although the child is not likely to make the contribution from his or her earnings, a parent could contribute any amount up to $1,500 to a Roth IRA for the child.*

But keep in mind that young adults, like anyone else, must have earned income to establish a Roth IRA. Generally, earned income is income received from working, not through an investment vehicle. It can include income from full-time employment, income from a part-time job while attending school, summer employment, or even babysitting or yard work. The amount that can be contributed annually to an IRA is limited to the lesser of earned income or the current maximum of $5,500.

Parents or other individuals who contribute the funds need to keep in mind that once the funds are in the child’s IRA account, the funds belong to the child. The child will be free to withdraw part or all of the funds at any time. If the child withdraws funds from the Roth IRA, the child will be liable for any early withdrawal tax liability.

Consider what the value of a Roth IRA at age 65 would be for a 17-year-old who has funds contributed to his or her IRA every year through age 26 (a period of 10 years). The table below shows what the value will be at age 65 at various investment rates of return.

 

Value of a Roth IRA—Annual Contributions of $1,000
for 10 years beginning at age 17
Investment Rate of Return
2%
4%
6%
8%
Value at Age 65
$23,703
$55,449
$127,900
$291,401

 

What may seem insignificant now can mean a lot at retirement. Individuals who are financially able to do so should consider making a gift that will last a lifetime. It could mean a comfortable retirement for your child, grandchild, favorite niece or nephew, or even an unrelated person who deserves the kind gesture.

*Amounts contributed to an IRA on behalf of another person are nondeductible gifts by the donor and are counted toward the donor’s annual $14,000 (2014 and 2015 gift exclusion per done).

If you would like more information about Roth IRAs or gifting contributions to a Roth on behalf of someone else, please contact this office.